Categories
#BlackGirlMagic #BlackLivesMatter #EverydayBlackHistory Black History Black History Month Civil Rights Movement Race Social Justice Women

#EverydayBlackHistory Day 4- Claudette Colvin

claudette.jpgToday, we celebrate and remember Rosa Parks on what would have been her 103rd birthday. Rosa Parks is known as the “mother of the Civil Rights Movement” and we are forever grateful for all her work towards freedom and justice. However, before Rosa Parks, there was Claudette Colvin.

Claudette Colvin was one of several women to refuse to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, AL prior to Rosa Parks. On March 2, 1955, nine months before Rosa Parks, Claudette Colvin refused to move stating, “I paid my fare and it’s my constitutional right.” In an interview she recalls, “I remember they dragged me off the bus because I refused to walk. They handcuffed me and took me to an adult jail.”  At the time, Claudette Colvin was 15 years old. She explains, “I just couldn’t move. History had me glued to the seat.”

Claudette Colvin was charged with assault and battery, disorderly conduct and defying the segregation law.

It’s important to understand how mush of a sacrifice Claudette Colvin’s actions actually were. Her parents felt that she put their family in danger, so much so that her father stayed up that entire night with a shotgun fully loaded, fearful that the KKK would come to their home. She also lost friends, with their parents saying she was “crazy” and an “extremist.”

Claudette Colvin wanted to continue her fight in the courts, unlike others that had refused to give up their seat. However, even after she sought out a lawyer, the black community leaders preferred to wait on taking legal action. Claudette Colvin had not had any civil rights training and, soon after the arrest, she became pregnant and had a child out of wedlock. She believes they felt she did not fit the image.

However, a year later, federal lawsuit Browder v. Gayle was filed, which included Claudette Colvin, Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, and Mary Louise Smith, and ultimately ended segregation on public transportation in Alabama.

Today, we remember Claudette Colvin for her courage and sacrifice. While there are some names that quickly come to mind when we think of the Civil Rights Movement, it is important to remember that there were thousands of foot soldiers who played major roles in the movement. We may not know all their names, but we are forever  indebted to them.

#EverydayBlackHistory

By Aleidra Allen

Aleidra Allen is a social change advocate and entrepreneur. With a background in higher education administration, Aleidra served as a higher education practitioner for 4 years. During that time, she coordinated leadership programs and multicultural education, and advised student organizations and fraternities and sororities, . However, as society entered into the current social movement, Aleidra’s career was redirected.

In September of 2017, Aleidra took a leap of faith and left higher education to start her own business. She is now the founder and owner of PIE, which stands for Purpose In Everything. PIE is a start-up social enterprise that sells every day products, adding purpose to the purchases by donating 5% of its net sales to fund social change work. The products are also ethically made, being sweatshop-free, and many of them are environmentally friendly.

PIE is committed to social justice, with the goal of inspiring consumers to contribute to social change through conscious and intentional buying. You can follow PIE on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @piemovement, and visit the PIE website at www.piemovement.com to #BuyOnPurpose. If you are interested in having Aleidra facilitate diversity and inclusion trainings/workshops for you school, organization, or corporation, please email info@piemovement.com.

Aleidra has shared her perspectives on larger platforms as a repeating guest on HuffPost Live. She has also been published on Watch The Yard and Blavity.

Aleidra received her Bachelor of Science in Community Communications and Leadership Development from the University of Kentucky (UK). She later earned her Master of Arts in Education (specialization in Higher Education Administration) from Louisiana State University (LSU). Aleidra is a board member for Continuity, an active member of the Gamma Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., a “Big” in Big Brothers Big Sisters, and a member of the choir at Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis, MO.

One reply on “#EverydayBlackHistory Day 4- Claudette Colvin”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s